Endangerment and Likeability of Wildlife Species: How Important are they for Proposed Payments for Conservation

Examines empirically the relative influence of the degree of endangerment of wildlife species and their stated likeability on individuals’ willingness to pay (WTP) for their conservation. To do this, it utilises data obtained from the IUCN Red List and likeability and WTP data obtained from two serial surveys of a sample of the Australian public who were requested to assess 24 Australian wildlife species in each of three animal classes: mammals, birds and reptiles. Between the first and second survey, respondents were provided with extra information about the focal species. This information resulted in the clear dominance of endangerment as the major influence on the WTP of respondents for the conservation of the focal wildlife species. Our results throw doubts on the proposition in the literature that the likeability of species is the dominant influence on WTP for conservation of wildlife species. Furthermore, our results suggest that the relationship between WTP for the conservation of wildlife in relation to their population levels may be more complex and different to that suggested in some of the literature on ecological economics.


Issue Date:
2004-12
Publication Type:
Working or Discussion Paper
DOI and Other Identifiers:
Issn: 1327-8231 (Other)
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/51419
Total Pages:
13
Series Statement:
Economics, Ecology and the Environment Working Paper
115




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-08-25

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