Turfgrass producer preferences for certification and royalty fee structures

Plant scientists have bred turfgrass varieties to create more desirable traits for long-term maintenance, appearance, utility, and resistance to abiotic and biotic stressors. As universities seek to capture revenue to cover research costs, these varieties are increasingly protected by intellectual property rights such as US plant patents and plant variety protection certificates. Producers require license to produce and sell proprietary varieties, and are required to pay royalties, impacting the types of varieties marketed for sale. Therefore, turf breeders must identify producer demand for various grass varieties, and understand their marketability. An online turfgrass preference survey with sod producers using a discrete choice experiment was conducted in Spring 2015. The design incorporated attributes such as variety, certification agency, fee structure, maintenance reduction potential, and price per square foot. Results from the analysis indicate that producers preferred genetically modified breeds and fee structures that allow producers to share the cost with the breed developers.


Issue Date:
2016
Publication Type:
Conference Paper/ Presentation
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/229978
Page range:
Turfgrass producer preferences for certification and royalty fee structures Deshamithra H. W. Jayasekera, Agricultural Economics and Natural Resources, Oklahoma State University, deshamithra.jayasekera@okstate.edu Tracy A. Boyer, Assistant Professor, Agricultural Economics and Natural Resources, Oklahoma State University, tracy.boyer@okstate.edu Benjamin H. Tong, Agricultural Economics and Natural Resources, Oklahoma State University, ben.tong@okstate.edu Dennis L. Martin, Professor, Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Oklahoma State University, dennis.martin@okstate.edu Selected paper prepared for presentation at the Southern Agricultural Economics Association’s 2016, SAAS Annual Meeting, San Antonio, TX February 6-10, 2016 Copyright 2016 by Deshamithra H.W. Jayasekera, Tracy A. Boyer, Benjamin H. Tong, and Dennis L. Martin. All rights reserved. Readers may make verbatim copies of this document for non-commercial purposes by any means, provided this copyright notice appears on all such copies.-Wu, Felicia. "Explaining public resistance to genetically modified corn: an analysis of the distribution of benefits and risks." Risk Analysis, 2004: 715-726. Yue, Chengyn, Charles R Hall, Bridget K Behe, Benjamin L Campbell, Jeniffer H Dennis, and Roberto G Lopez. "Are consumers willing to pay more for biodegradable containers than for plastic ones? Evidence from hypothetical conjoint analysis and nonhypothetical experimental auctions." Journal of Agricultural and Applied economics, 2010: 757-772.
Total Pages:
22
JEL Codes:
D18; L15




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-08-22

Fulltext:
Download fulltext
PDF

Rate this document:

Rate this document:
1
2
3
 
(Not yet reviewed)