BENEFIT COST FOR BIOMASS CO-FIRING IN ELECTRICITY GENERATION: CASE OF UTAH, U.S.

Policy making regarding biomass co-firing is difficult. The article provides a benefit-cost analysis for decision makers to facilitate policy making process to implement efficient biomass co-firing policy. The additional cost is the sum of cost of the biom ass procurement and biomass transportation. Co-benefits are sales of greenhouse gas emission credits and health benefit from reducing harmful air pollutants, especially particulate matter. The benefit-cost analysis is constructed for semi-arid U.S. region, Utah, where biomass supply is limited. Results show that biomass co-firing is not economically feasible in Utah but would be feasible when co-benefits are considered. Benefit-cost ratio is critically dependent upon biomass and carbon credit prices. The procedure to build the benefit-cost ratio can be applied for any region with other scenarios suggested in this study.


Issue Date:
2015-07
Publication Type:
Journal Article
DOI and Other Identifiers:
ISSN 2147-8988 (Other)
E-ISSN: 2149-3766 (Other)
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/208847
Published in:
International Journal of Food and Agricultural Economics, Volume 03, Number 3
Page range:
15-30
Total Pages:
16
Series Statement:
Vol 3
No 3




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-08-22

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