PROJECTING THE BENEFITS OF GOLDEN RICE IN THE PHILIPPINES

Golden Rice has been genetically engineered to produce beta-carotene in the endosperm of the grain. It could improve the vitamin A status of deficient food consumers, especially women and children in the developing world. This paper analyses the potential impacts in a Philippine context. Since the technology is still at the stage of R&D, benefits are simulated within a scenario approach. The health effects are quantified using the methodology of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). Golden Rice will not completely eliminate the problems of vitamin A deficiency, such as blindness or increased mortality rates. So it should be seen as a complement rather than a substitute for alternative interventions. Yet, the technology will reduce related health costs significantly. In monetary terms, annual gains will lie between $23 million and $137 million, depending on the underlying assumptions. A preliminary cost-benefit analysis shows high returns on R&D investments. Micronutrient-enriched crops are an efficient way to reduce deficiency problems among the poor, and related research projects should receive higher political priority.


Issue Date:
2002
Publication Type:
Working or Discussion Paper
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/18753
Total Pages:
33
Series Statement:
ZEF Discussion Papers on Development Policy No. 51




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-10-21

Fulltext:
Download fulltext
PDF

Rate this document:

Rate this document:
1
2
3
 
(Not yet reviewed)