IMMIGRATION, MEAT PACKING, AND TRADE: IMPLICATIONS FOR IOWA

For a postscript copy of this paper, click <a href="/Data/isu/isu285.ps"> here. The paper examines changes in employment and wage patterns, industrial restructuring, and foreign competition that affect opportunities of recent immigrants to the non-metropolitan Midwest, especially to Iowa. The focus is on food and kindred products where meat and poultry packing and processing are major components. Although total employment in this industry declined between 1980 and 1990, a significant increase in employment of Hispanic- and Asian- origin persons occurred in Iowa. As unions weakened and the real wage rate declined sharply during 1980-85 in meat and poultry packing and processing, new job opportunities for recent immigrants became available. These jobs provided full-time year-round work at significantly above the minimum wage and made regular schooling for their children and frequently home ownership possible. Note: Tables are not included in the PDF file--contact the authors for more information.


Issue Date:
1996
Publication Type:
Working or Discussion Paper
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/18234
Total Pages:
16
Series Statement:
Staff Paper 285




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-08-24

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