COMPENSATION FOR WILDLIFE DAMAGE: HABITAT CONVERSION, SPECIES PRESERVATION AND LOCAL WELFARE

We study the environmental and economic consequences of introducing a program to compensate peasants of a small economy for the damage caused by wildlife. We show that the widely held belief that compensation induces wildlife conservation may be erroneous. In a partially open economy, compensation can lower the wildlife stock and result in a net welfare loss for local people. In an open economy, compensation can trigger wildlife extinction and also reduce welfare. The conditions leading to a reduction of the wildlife stock are identified and the implications for current and planned compensation programs are discussed.


Issue Date:
2003
Publication Type:
Working or Discussion Paper
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/18158
Total Pages:
36
Series Statement:
REPA Working Paper 2003-01




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-04-04

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