The welfare costs of urban outdoor water restrictions

Outdoor water restrictions are usually implemented as bans on a particular type of watering technology (sprinklers), which allow households to substitute for labour-intensive (hand-held) watering. This paper presents a household production model approach to analysing the impact of sprinkler restrictions on consumer welfare and their efficacy as a demand management tool. Central to our empirical analysis is an experimentally derived production function which describes the relationship between irrigation and lawn quality. We demonstrate that for a typical consumer complete sprinkler bans may be little more effective than milder restrictions policies, but are substantially more costly to the household.


Issue Date:
2007
Publication Type:
Journal Article
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/118331
Published in:
Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Volume 51, Issue 3
Page range:
243-261
Total Pages:
19




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-11-15

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