TWENTY-FOUR YEARS OF FARMLAND PRESERVATION IN MICHIGAN, PA 116

Michigan, similar to other states in the Great Lakes and Midwest area, entered the farmland preservation arena in the early 1970's in response to a growing concern over the conversion of farmland to non-agricultural uses. Reports indicated that farmland acreage in Michigan was being converted to non-agricultural uses at a rate of 300 acres per day and 30,000 lots per year were created between 1940-1970. A Governor's Blue Ribbon Commission in 1970 provided evidence that the loss of farmland in the state was an emerging state policy concern and made several recommendations which ultimately lead to "Farmland and Open Space Preservation Act," Public Act 116, 1974, hereafter referred to as the P.A. 116 Program. The purpose of the Program was to slow the conversion of farmland to non-farm uses while at the same time provide property tax relief to farmland owners because farmers claimed that high property taxes were forcing them to sell land for development. Payments from the State were made in exchange for development rights for an agreed upon period.


Issue Date:
1999
Publication Type:
Working or Discussion Paper
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/11562
Total Pages:
17
Series Statement:
Staff Paper 99-2




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-08-23

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