State-Branded Programs and Consumer Preference for Locally Grown Produce

Revitalization of state brands is deemed important to several constituencies. Stated preference with choice experiment methods were used to elicit consumer preferences for two locally grown products: spinach, which has had a well-publicized food safety incidence, and carrots, which have had no such incidence in recent history. A full factorial design was used to implement the choice experiment, with each commodity having four identical attributes varying at different levels. Findings reveal that consumers are willing to pay a premium for locally grown spinach marked with the Arizona Grown label over locally grown spinach that was not labeled. This premium was higher than the premium that would be paid for state-branded carrots. This difference highlights consumers’ perceptions of “locally grown” as an indicator of safety in their food supply. Findings have important implications with respect to providing consumer value and point to differentiated positioning strategies for state-branded produce.


Issue Date:
2011-04
Publication Type:
Journal Article
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/107472
Published in:
Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Volume 40, Number 1
Page range:
20-32
Total Pages:
13




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-04-04

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