Energy, Agriculture, and GHG Emissions: The Role of Agriculture in Alternative Energy Production and GHG Emission Reduction in North Dakota

Energy, agriculture, and GHG emissions are highly interrelated. Several agricultural commodities are currently used as feedstock for biofuel production to replace fossil fuels. As the largest consumer of energy, the U.S. has taken several initiatives to reduce the use of fossil fuels, achieve energy security, and reduce GHG emissions. The industrial community of the U.S. invested heavily in biofuel and wind energy production. North Dakota has highest potential in producing wind energy and biomass from dedicated energy crops. Unfortunately these resources are not fully utilized for producing renewable energy. North Dakota is an energy intensive economy and per capita energy consumption is higher than other states. This technical bulletin provides a comprehensive report on the energy production and related emissions in the United States with special emphasis on North Dakota. The bulletin also discusses various alternative methods to reduce GHG emissions to meet the regulatory standards with a special emphasis on North Dakota. The study found that North Dakota produces the cheapest electricity and a major share is consumed outside the state. The price of electricity does not include negative externalities associated with burning lignite coal. North Dakota uses its potential to produce wind and corn ethanol to a great extent. The state level policies and financial supports are directed to wind industry and energy efficiency measures. The current renewable portfolio standards and non-compliance adversely affect the renewable energy industry in North Dakota.


Issue Date:
2011-02
Publication Type:
Report
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/101222
Total Pages:
53
Series Statement:
Agribusiness & Applied Economics Report
677




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-08-26

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