Pathways to Improved Profitability and Sustainability of Cotton Cultivation at Farm Level in Africa: an Approach to Addressing Critical Knowledge Gaps

In 2009, the World Bank published a comparative study of cotton sector reforms, based on detailed case studies carried out during 2007/08 in nine of Africa’s main cotton producing countries. The purpose of the study was to draw practical insights from the diversity of experiences in institutional reforms of cotton sectors and to better understand the strengths and weaknesses of the different types of sectors operating in Africa, the likely effects of specific types of policy change, and the possible ways forward. This paper develops a concept note for additional research that would address the perceived weaknesses of the earlier work. The underlying hypothesis of the proposed study is that technology research, farmer training, and policy and institutional reforms to improve cotton sector productivity and incomes tend to be designed for typical or model farmers. This often fails to take into account the diversity among cotton farmers and what this diversity implies for cotton sector development in general and the ability of the cotton sector to contribute to poverty reduction in particular. The proposed research is expected to contribute to aggregate growth in cotton productivity and incomes through the design of more targeted support interventions based on a better understanding of the strategies, capacities, and constraints of the different types of cotton farmers.


Issue Date:
2011-02
Publication Type:
Working or Discussion Paper
PURL Identifier:
http://purl.umn.edu/101163
Total Pages:
62
Series Statement:
MSU International Development Working Paper
112




 Record created 2017-04-01, last modified 2017-08-26

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